Mythic Sunship : Upheaval

Mythic Sunship are a band that waste no time with subtleties. There’s no tip-toeing around whether things are gonna get loud and intense, as you know right as the first song begins to play on any of their albums that things are gonna get pretty damn loud. And pretty damn intense. But that’s not to say they don’t get nuance or dynamics. The Copenhagen four-piece know when to bring things down just enough to give the listener a little breathing room. You know, let ’em see some blue sky and a pinch of sunlight before the sky turns red again and molten lava reigns down once again as these “Anaconda Rockers” put their heaviest foot forward and set free their fuzzed-out, monolithic riffage.

Welcome to the world of Mythic Sunship, lovelies.

These monolithic rockers released their first record with El Paraiso in May of 2016. Ouroboros introduced the better part of the universe to the tectonic sounds of Mythic Sunship. Not quite a year later in April of 2017 they were at it again with the excellent Land Between Rivers. Not to just sit on their musical laurels, the guys are back with a new album just a mere nine months later after Rivers. Upheaval is both Mythic Sunship’s heaviest and most nuanced record yet. The double guitar attack crackles and shakes the earth, while the rhythm section gives the guys a solid foundation to do as much damage as possible. There’s also a lot of contemplative moments here strewn throughout the skull-rattling guitar and bone-crunching bass. It’s an all-encompassing sonic shakedown.

While on first listen Mythic Sunship’s sound seems like a blunt tool for eardrum and psychic destruction, you’d be mistaken not to let yourself sink into the wall of sound. Inside that sound wall is a center of bliss. “Tectonic Breach” opens the album with the said wall of sound, but burrow into it’s center and look out from inside it. Once at the heart of this beast of a song you look out and its as if you’re at the controls of a Jaeger, a man manning a towering creature of destruction. That may be a dramatic way to put it, but its totally the vibe you feel. This song sounds like some cross pollination of Blue Cheer and Voltron. There’s both punk rock blunt force and carefully layered sonics. “Aether Flux” shows the band dialing down the rock and roll destruction derby for a more windswept, post-rock feel. At moments the song is reminiscent of psych rock big brothers(and labelmates) Causa Sui, but as the 10-minute epic rolls along the guys muddy the crystalline waters a bit with some fuzzed-out goodness. All in all, a steady, vibe-y classic.

Go to side B and all bets are off. “Cosmic Rupture” is a tour-de-force of molten groove and “Anaconda Rock” as Mythic Sunship’s music essence has been dubbed. It’s sleek but brutal. With each passing second the band tightens up on you until your gasping for breath(or at least another beer.) Amidst the fire and fury there’s also plenty of groove and space-y vibes to get lost in. The twin guitar attack adds a flurry of noise, like a hornet’s nest at full agitation. “Into Oblivion” closes the album on a dirge-y note. This is about as doom metal as the Sunship has gotten. The track opens ominously in drop-D, as if Tony Iommi himself is there in spirit. Pretty soon tribal drums roll in and things begin to build. Like a battalion off to war, these four guys make their way through over 13 minutes of barb wire, enemy fire, and a steady march that leads to a climactic end, complete with a flurry of guitar squall J Mascis would be proud of. The drum and bass groove here is what keeps the track on a steady forward motion through the muck and mire. This is one hell of a way to end an album.

Upheaval keeps Mythic Sunship moving in an upward motion. With each successive record this quartet from Copenhagen take that blunt musical tool they wield so well and refine and hone it into something more precise and exhilarating. Upheaval is a masterclass in sonic annihilation.

Drop the needle for your rock and roll comeuppance.

8. 4 out of 10

 

Mythic Sunship : Land Between Rivers

Mythic Sunship seem to have appeared out of some ancient musical text. Through sounds and textures as old as weathered folklore and whispers under the breath in the shadows of centuries-old mountaintops, these Danish musicians make music both primitive and not of this earth. Like thunder clapping in the distance, their new album Land Between Rivers takes its first breath as a quiet chattering, but soon pours its mighty roar down and never lets up. Never. Mythic Sunship made their initial landing last year with their fiery Ourboros. It made no qualms about what Mythic Sunship were about, which was pummeling guitar, crushing drums, and epic songs that sounded like explosives battles put to music.

On Land Between Rivers opener “Nishapur” their ear-shattering mission statement stays on point. It opens with quiet, brooding guitar that builds into a cacophony of fuzz and distortion. Quite literally a wall of noise. Drums crashing like angry waves against the hull of a ship, guitar squall bashing into itself over and over, and bass acting as an anchor so as to not let the song fly into orbit “Nishapur” is a bludgeoning of the senses.

It’s one hell of an opener.

“High Tide” has an almost garage-y vibe in its opening moments. Motor City acid fuzz sprinkled with something sinister; something not of this earth. Soon enough though Mythic Sunship hit the interstellar overdrive button and light speed is reached. Anything resembling the gritty streets of Detroit in 1969 are washed away by the primitive drum beats and hazy, reverbed guitars that knock our psyche into orbit. There’s a sense the Sunship crew have tapped into some subconscious, Altered States-like primitive instinct. I’m not calling these cats cavemen by any means. I mean, what caveman could man a rockin’ ship this advanced? What I do mean is that they’ve gone deep in search of the essence of heavy here. They’re going back to the beginnings of that heavy, far out sound. Sabbath, Blue Cheer, Hawkwind, and all those other brave souls that took that one small musical step for man, so that there could be that one giant musical leap for mankind. They leave the frills, movements, suites, and concepts for the art school types and wordy chaps. Here we have pure rock concentrate.

“Silt” finds us in a haze of distortion and feedback. It’s like being lost in a blazing ball of white light. Blind to the world, you can only feel your way around the room in a glow of distilled energy. Soon enough the light fades and in its place is a darkened sky, lightning pulsating just behind the storm clouds. It’s an overwhelming display of power and existential doom. “Silt” is the heaviest Mythic Sunship have gotten, cresting Om and Sunn O))) territory, but without all that unnecessary chanting. If you turn this one up to 11 you may disintegrate before you reach the end.

Land Between Rivers sounds like a band in the midst of a musical storm. Mythic Sunship have upped themselves and their debut with an album that wastes no time getting around to melting your psyche. With three tracks spanning over 30 minutes, the Sunship lock into a distortion-laden groove and never let up until our ears are buzzing and the space/time continuum has been fully disrupted. Land Between Rivers is blissful, primitive rock for the new millennium space traveler.

8. 4 out of 10

Mythic Sunship : Ouroboros

Copenhagen’s Mythic Sunship dabble in a raw kind of free form jamming that gazes into the heart of the sun, and then goes full forcemythic into the blazing star’s fiery center. There’s no smoothing out the rough edges with these guys. There’s no breezy synth textures or ambient head space created on their debut titled Ouroboros. In fact, they make those rough edges as jagged as possible and let the shards fall where they may. Ouroboros is a three-track full-length that expands minds while melting them at the same time.

Mythic Sunship’s Ouroboros is yet another excellent long player coming out of the wilds of Denmark and curated by those musical merry pranksters at El Paraiso Records. You’d be hard pressed to find anything short of brilliant coming out of that label(listen to their previous 2016 releases Jakob Skott’s All The Colours Of The Dust and Nicklas Sorensen’s Solo for proof.) Mythic Sunship are no different, and Ouroboros packs a musical wallop. “Ophidian Rising” starts right up and never lets go of the jugular. A full throttle doomy fuzz jam in the Sabbath-ian tradition, with some serious stoned-out groove thrown in for good measure. These guys have a bevy of stomp boxes at their disposal and they seem to have no problem engaging a good portion of them here in this 10 minute opener. For those of you that worship at the alter of Isaiah Mitchell and Earthless you will find plenty to bow down to right here. “Year Of The Serpent” floats among the crystalline skies and never wavers in its mission to capture the feeling an out-of-body experience. As the song progresses so does the spaced-out fuzz and feedback battles. This is one of those classic basement tracks. Crouched in a bean bag chair with Koss headphones strapped to your head you let the song fill your skull. There’s a pint of your favorite brew next to you and the incense fills the air in that dark space that surrounds you, the only light is the strobe on the turntable.

Before flipping the record you need to go upstairs and get a refill of that brew because all of side two is dominated by the epic mind melter “Leviathan”, a 21 minute explosion of noise, riffs, and tribal beats before turning into an all out aural assault. Doom, psych, and free-form exploratory riffing is all over this track. It’s a workout of epic proportions.

With a band name that tips their hat to the likes of John Coltrane and Sun Ra, you’re setting expectations pretty high among the musicphiles(nerds) of the universe. But there’s no denying this Cophenhagen four piece their ambition and musical means of supassing that ambition. Ouroboros is one hell of a debut. Stocked with plenty of raw rock grit and intellectual noodling to satisfy even the most finicky of musical tastes.

8.2 out of 10